Create Your Own Path. Be a Leader.

It’s easier to follow other’s path. Almost everyone is doing the same. Why would you need to spend more time to create your own path? The one who creates his own path might not be the most successful person, but there’s something priceless in creating our own path. Similar to the interface design. When something feels and looks good, people would start adapting that interface. Take Path interaction for the menu. More and more apps are doing the same with Path. Pablo Picasso once said “good artists borrow, great artists steal,” but does this mean copy-and-paste?

Path Interface

Path Interface

Innovation distinguishes between a leader and a follower.” What does innovation mean? From the webster: “the introduction of something new, a new idea, method, or device.” Every new idea is just a modification of existing ideas. Let’s do something different, using Path interface as an inspiration. Let’s ask questions.

  • On Path, users tap the menu to show options. What if they don’t tap? Slide? Drag?
  • The menu icon stays. What if it moves?
  • The options are in circle. What if they’re in different shape? Rectangle? Half circle?

Based on those simple questions, I’ve sketched a simple interaction on my small notebook.

I’ve created a prototype using Axure. You can use your desktop browser to try the prototype, but I’d suggest you to open this prototype on your phone, so you can try the drag-and-release interaction:

Own Path Menu Prototype.

The animation might not be perfect, but it’s good enough to show the idea. Is this better than Path interface? Maybe not. The key to get good ideas, is to get a lot of ideas. You’ll never know which idea might lead you to a great idea, the idea that would make you a leader. Don’t just copy-and-paste. Be a leader.

Note: If you want to know how it’s being done, you can join the discussion and download the .rp file (Axure) from this Axure Forum discussion thread: Creating a Path-like Menu in a New Way.

3 thoughts on “Create Your Own Path. Be a Leader.

  1. Pingback: Creating a Path-like Menu in a New Way.

  2. I think this is a good thread. I feel every UX practitioner should continue on-going UX studies. However, I would say part of being a leader and forging your own path is being a practitioner of the Law of Emulation. It is often a fast-track method, yielding calculable results, while also being cost effective much of the time. This law states that whatever you do in likeness, conditions also in likeness, will yield like results. Of course there are exceptions. There is no sense in re-inventing the wheel, most of the time. However, sometimes people do re-invent the wheel. Take friction-less, electromagnetic pull (i.e. Japan’s 310mph bullet train).

    Nice simulation you did in Axure. However, on-tap will probably work better than an upwards flick/drag, as iOS7 now uses the upward drag from the bottom of the screen to access the “Control Center” menu. The Path navigation, though seemingly innovative, actually borrows from JING. Who knows, maybe Jing even borrowed it’s corner fan menu from another company. I know Jing has been around since 2007. That makes the “fan” style corner interface over 6 years old. Regarding moving the tap/toggled interface, facebook also does this with mobile chat threads. Though it’s a unique implementation, it’s also not a 1st. Many flash websites have used a drag-and-drop menu since year 2000. I’m sure others can site the concept that pre-dates year 2000.

    You do pose some good questions. I would like to see you explore it. I think if a child can use it – the mass may find it extremely usable as well.

    All the best,
    Arondale

  3. Pingback: Whose path is it? | Jacqui Senn

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